nick drake

chico, elton & nick…

chico é, certamente, um dos ouvintes com a maior quilometragem a bordo do jumboteKo… isso, desde a flu fm. JISUS!

ele enviou esse link das gravinas de sir reginaldo com algumas canções de nick drake realizadas em 1970 (e não em 1968 como está estampado)… aliás, comunicação do material é uma tremenda pegadinha já que são apenas 4 de autoria de nick e as outras passam por john martyn, mike heron (incredible string band)… tudo gerenciado pela leNda joe boyd, o tal um que perdeu uma partida de ping-pong para kassin…

The title looks like a joke, or a misprint: Elton John sings at a session that had anything to do with Nick Drake? Surely you jest, sir! But this session actually did take place, though in July 1970, not 1968, as the title indicates. And it’s not John and Drake performing together: John does sing much of the material, but Drake is not present in any way. The full story is that producer Joe Boyd organized these tracks as a publisher’s demo to circulate the compositions of Drake, John & Beverley Martyn, Mike Heron, and Ed Carter. John actually only covers four Drake tunes, and John‘s versions are so different that you might not even recognize the songs without looking at the titles. John strips the music of its odd melancholia; the results sound like, well, early Elton John records. So, despite the good fidelity, it’s a curiosity for both Drake and John fans, nothing more. John also offers covers of other British folk songwriters on the disc, and some of the tracks feature Linda Thompson (then known as Linda Peters) rather than John on vocals. The documentation on this particular bootleg isn’t perfect, incidentally; it’s missing one of the 11 songs that circulate from this session, though not one of the ones that Drakewrote. As a bonus, the CD also contains 14 songs grouped together under the heading “Best of 1968 DJM Demos,” from the time just before John issued his first solo album. The sound quality on these studio recordings isn’t great (though it’s all right), but these are interesting glimpses of the singer/songwriter as his style formed, even if the writing in particular is more derivative at this point than it would be within a couple of years. It’s strongly influenced by late-’60s Beatlesque pop and, to a lesser extent, early singer/songwriters, the Bee Gees, and psychedelia. The material’s more a promising kernel than it is the work of a distinctive talent, although the best of it is modestly enjoyable on its own terms.

(allmusic.com)

sabe quem sopra velinhas, hoje?

leNda!

acompanhado, nessa música, por richard thompson (guitarra) & danny thompson (baixo)… fairport convention e pentangle, juntinhos!

tem noção se existiria “espaço” para Ele, atualmente, no cenário musical?

nem precisa queimar a mufa, basta imaginar que, no final dos anos 60, quando Ele apareceu, os “apressadinhos” de plantão – também – viraram as costas.

como diz nosso filósofo boça: “puta mundo injusto, meu”

nick

cris & nick…

“Nick”, é o show onde Cris Braun interpreta canções de — e em torno de — Nick Drake, o enigmático trovador inglês que pediu as contas em 1974, aos 26 anos. A direção musical é de Billy Brandão; o roteiro, de Rodrigo Penna; e os textos de Arthur Dapieve. Nas próximas terça e quarta-feira ,dias 18 e 19 às 20h30m, no Espaço Sesc, na Domingos Ferreira 160, em Copacabana.”

Ingressos- 20,00 e 10,00

acorda (john+nick)…

( :

Solid Air is a folk jazz album released in 1973 by John Martyn on Island Records.

Contemporary reviews were favourable with music paper Sounds declaring that Solid Air flows beautifully and shows the entire spectrum of music that John Martyn has at his fingertips.” [1] The album has continued to receive acclaim and is included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die by Robert Dimery.[2] The album was rated as the 67th Greatest British Album Ever by the British music magazine Q, and was also included in their list of Best Chill-Out Albums Of All Time.

“Solid Air”, the title track, was dedicated to a friend of Martyn’s, Nick Drake[citation needed]. Drake died of an antidepressant overdose 18 months after the album was released. Martyn said of the track “It was done for a friend of mine, and it was done right with very clear motives, and I’m very pleased with it, for varying reasons. It has got a very simple message, but you’ll have to work that one out for yourself.”[1]

“May You Never” became something of a signature song for Martyn, becoming a staple of his live performances. Released in November 1971 as a single in an early form, the song was re-recorded during the Solid Air sessions.[3] Eric Clapton covered “May You Never” on his 1977 album Slowhand. When Martyn was presented with a lifetime achievement award by Phil Collins (a collaborator of Martyn’s) at the 2008 BBC Folk Awards, Clapton sent a message saying that he was “so far ahead of everything else it was inconceivable” and acknowledged the extent of his influence on “everyone who ever heard him.”[4][5]Martyn and his band, including John Paul Jones on mandolin, played “May You Never” and “Over The Hill” at the Awards Ceremony.[6]

In 2006, Martyn performed the album live in its entirety as part of the All Tomorrow’s Parties-curated Don’t Look Back series and subsequently toured the UK.

A double CD reissue curated by John Hillarby was released in 2009, including several alternate studio and live versions.